Tag Archives: Arcade

Pig Eat Ball

pig-eat-ball-gameplay-screenshot-1There will be one big challenge in this write up of Pig Eat Ball. Can words adequately convey what the game is? Or will the the images in this article better explain what the game is all about? So, here we go.

Let’s begin with story. That’s as good a place as any to start. Players take control of a space pig named Bow. Her father is the king of the space station that she lives on and feels Bow is at the age where she aught to marry. With that he has begun a competition for the eligible bachelors of the space station. Whoever wins will get to marry Bow. Of course, Bow is none too pleased about this. So, she decides to enter the contest herself in disguise. Her hope is that if she wins she’ll be able to get out of her situation.

With that, players embark on a journey through the various sectors of the space station. Here they’ll find the different stages scattered about, easily identifiable by large space clams. Bow must complete the challenges that they set out for her. When she successfully does this, they will give her a pearl.

pig-eat-ball-gameplay-screenshot-2Many of the tasks given to Bow will involve collecting tennis balls. She gathers these by wandering around, sucking them up, and storing them in her belly. The difficulty here is that these make her fat. She’s already quite plump, but after gobbling up a few of these balls, she’ll become too big to get through narrow passages. If players want to slim her down to get through, they’ll need to make use of the barf button.

Yes, there’s a barf button. It’s actually extremely important. Using it will cause Bow to vomit up whatever tennis balls she has consumed, blasting them out in a spray of green slime. It makes a huge mess, but that’s just the way things go. Once she’s walked through the narrow area, she can suck up the balls again. However, it’s better to wait a few seconds for the vomit to drip off of them. If players rush and wind up making Bow consume three vomit-drenched balls, she’ll feel sick and throw up again. So, patience is key here.

Throwing up isn’t just useful for getting through tight spots. It’s also a weapon. The stages often have enemies that want to do harm to Bow. These aren’t exactly the safest places in the world. Luckily, she can barf on them. This will usually hold them in place or slow them down for a while as they are covered in goopy green bile. So, as one can see, vomit is a multi-purpose tool on Bow’s path to victory.

pig-eat-ball-gameplay-screenshot-4Stages feel like something right out of an 80s or 90s arcade game in terms of layout. There will be all sorts of obstacles in the way of Bow and the tennis balls that she needs to collect. There are the aforementioned narrow spots. There’s enemies lurking about. There are one-way paths. There are spiky things that you don’t want to come into contact with. The game also has a number of areas where Bow can use her suction to attract a ball, but needs to lead it through a puzzle-like labyrinth in order to actually get to it. Some stages go for something completely different too. For instance, there’s a sandwich making level. Another is themed around bowling. There are also boss stages with giant, over-the-top enemies to defeat. These things are even more over-the-top than whatever players have experienced up to that point. That’s really saying something.

The game also makes references to several classic arcade games with its level design. Players will likely spot the obvious ones right away like Pac Man and Q-Bert. Others may take a little while to recognize depending on how knowledgeable one is about these games.

Stages also award players on how well they are completed. As such, there is plenty of motivation to replay them and trying to get a first place gold medal in every challenge. Each stage has clever, efficient ways to complete them. It’s actually quite satisfying figuring these out.

If players tire of playing the stages already present in Pig Eat Ball, there’s even a level editor. With that people can create their own stages, or just play levels created by the community. This opens the door to a bottomless pit of stages to keep people busy.

The game even supports a party mode for four-player local multiplayer. With that, the door is open to rigorous vomiting with friends. In a virtual setting anyway. The logistics for real life group vomiting would probably be a nightmare.

pig-eat-ball-gameplay-screenshot-4Pig Eat Ball‘s aesthetic really helps to cement the zaniness of the game. This is seen first and foremost in the character design. Right from the opening scene, players are introduced to Bow’s father. He has a cake for a head and a personality not all that dissimilar to the King of All Cosmos. It certainly sets the tone for the game. Players are later introduced to the king’s guards. These guys also have cakes for heads. There are the peculiar-looking clams, too. It would also seem that there are a number of mischievous pill bugs with a penchant for tennis milling around the station. On top of this, the color scheme and level of detail in the visuals helps everything really pop off the screen. It’s very similar to the bright colors so common in classic arcade games.

Meanwhile, the game’s soundtrack is lighthearted and upbeat. It has a lot of memorable tunes and they’re easy to get stuck in one’s head. They all do a lot to bring that arcade game feel to the forefront.

It can be very hard to make a video game that is meant to come off as weird and over the top, but also not seem contrived. Pig Eat Ball does this very well. It’s visual style and characters are endearing, while gameplay is entertaining, silly, requires some thought, and is just an overall good time. People looking for something well off the beaten path would do well to try this game out. It’s easily one of the most unusual, yet enjoyable titles to come along in a very long time.

Pig Eat Ball is currently available for Windows, Mac, and Linux via Steam and Itch.io, as well as  PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.

Fight’N Rage

fight-n-rage-gameplay-screenshot-1Developers don’t need to reinvent the wheel to make a great game. Sometimes a heartfelt love letter to games of old can be a lot of fun too. This is what we have with Fight’N Rage, an old school arcade beat ’em up. With beautiful sprites, exciting combat, unlockables, and branching paths to experiment with, there’s a lot to like here.

Taking place in a dystopian future where despotic mutants rule the world (basically animal people a la The Isle of Dr. Moreau), players control some of the few humans left (and their mutant sympathizers) in a fight for their freedom. There are three characters that can be played. First there’s Gal, a girl who escaped from human traders. She’s the most agile of the bunch, able to get in, do damage, then back off quickly. Next there is F. Norris, a runaway ninja with a mysterious past. He’s the glass cannon of the bunch, as he hits very hard but his defenses aren’t great. Finally, there’s Ricardo. He’s a minotaur human rights activist. Seeing as he’s a wrestler, Ricardo has a lot of strength and good defense, but due to his size is the slowest character.

fight-n-rage-gameplay-screenshot-2Once a character has been selected, it’s off to go punch mutants in the face. Here players will see that the combat in Figh’N Rage is actually quite robust. Of course, each playable character handles in their own unique way. Adding even more depth, though, is just how varied the enemies are. There are quite a few different enemy types, and they each have their own move sets and behaviors that players must learn. As the game progresses, there will be a lot of these creatures on screen at once all doing their thing. So, players are going to have a lot on their plate between managing the hordes of enemies, how they attack, and how to make the most of each situation depending on which character they’re using.

This doesn’t even begin to touch the bosses in the game. These things are orders of magnitude more difficult. They have powerful moves that are very much so telegraphed, but it takes time to figure out how to get past their defenses. Even when one manages that, it’s usually about the time where the game will decide its a good idea for henchmen to start spawning, making the fight all the more challenging. Players will likely get through these boss fights eventually since there are unlimited continues. However, doing well in these fights is something else entirely. It will take a lot of practice to really nail the fights and make them look easy.

While all of this is going on, Fight’N Rage adds one more layer to everything. There are actually a number of branching paths in the game. Some of these are fairly obvious, with arrows pointing to other areas players can go to. Other times, players’ actions will determine how the story unfolds.

fight-n-rage-gameplay-screenshot-3A quick example of this is the first boss of the game. He’ll take a human hostage and threaten to slit her throat if players approach. Ignoring him will result in that outcome, and send the player off to some sewers with a mole man boss in the next stage. However, if the player is holding a weapon and throws it at the boss, he’ll be startled and drop the hostage. After defeating the boss, the hostage will take players to a different underground path that leads to a village. So, players will need to experiment a bit to see all of the different areas that they can go to.

Each time one plays the game, they will accumulate points. These can be used to unlock all sorts of goodies. These include extra game modes, costumes for the main characters, as well as being able to unlock all of the different mutants and using them in the extra modes.

fight-n-rage-gameplay-screenshot-4As one can see just by looking at all of the screenshots here, the game goes for a retro, 16-bit look. The pixel work is very detailed, and all of the characters and enemies are oozing personality. Stages are varied and have nice little touches for those who care to look. Meanwhile, the music is high energy, guitar driven fair, just right for facing off with hordes of angry mutants.

There have been quite a few beat ’em ups to come along in recent years. Each is clearly heavily influenced by the classics of the past. They’ve captured what made these games great to varying degrees. However, Fight’N Rage stands head and shoulders above most of these. The sheer quality of the game’s combat alone is reason enough to play. Its quality visuals and music, unlockables, and such are just icing on the cake. People looking for a quality beat ’em up should seriously consider trying Fight’N Rage out.

Figh’N Rage is available for Windows.

In Development: Garrison: Archangel

garrison-archangel-gameplay-screenshot-1Back in the 80s and 90s, mecha anime was all the rage. Shows like Gundam, Macross, VOTOMs, and countless others battled it out for viewers’ attention.  For a lot of fans, these things were the future. Who cares about flying cars when you could have giant robots instead?

Of course, as these things’ popularity grew, all sorts of merchandise related to them began to spring up. It was only a matter of time before mecha video games would become a thing. During the late 90s and early 2000s, there were two series that captured people’s imaginations for a time. The first was SEGA’s Virtual On. The second was From Software’s Armored Core.

While they both had players doing battle in giant robots, the series took decidedly different approaches to them. Virtual On went for a pure arcade experience. As a result, combat was very fast as players whizzed around arenas blasting at their opponents before hitting their thrusters and going in for a melee attack. Each robot was like a character in a fighting game. The mechanized killing machine was pre-made with a very distinct identity to it.

Meanwhile, Armored Core felt a bit more like it was trying to be a simulation. There was a lot more variety in how mechs handled. Some were pretty nimble, but there were a lot of other ones that had a slower, lumbering feel to them. This is largely a result of the extreme levels of customization that players had at their fingertips when choosing a mech here. They could swap out torsos, arms, heads, legs, even do away with legs in favor of tank treads. There were internal systems that could be swapped out as well. This doesn’t even take into account weapon load outs. Really there was a ton of options in terms of how players could go into battle when it came to the Armored Core series.

garrison-archangel-gameplay-screenshot-2So, there were two very good mecha games that each approached the genre in their own way, each garnering their own audience of dedicated fans in the process. They were both good games, but that’s all in the past now. Studios haven’t made games like that in a very long time. It’s kind of sad, really. But perhaps fans of giant robots shouldn’t give up hope just yet.

Indigo Entertainment has been working on a mecha game of their own for the last while: Garrison: Archangel. What makes it particularly interesting is that they are trying to combine a lot of what made Virtual On and Armored Core great, and put it all into one game.

It takes the fast-paced arena combat of Virtual On while giving players the customization of Armored Core. As such, players are given a lot of options for how they want their giant robots to perform with regards to stats, appearance, load outs and the like, while being greeted with very frenetic gameplay when competing in matches.

So far, customization provides a lot of options, with millions of possible combinations as to how one’s robot will look and perform. This mode will give players a lot of avenues as to how they want to approach combat. There is a worrying lack of tank tread or quadruped options in the leg department, but here’s to hoping that maybe these get added at some point.

garrison-archangel-gameplay-screenshot-3Meanwhile, the matches’ tempo are very quick, making them very reminiscent of Virtual On. Mechas have thrusters equipped the that allow for quick side dashes, blasting forward to close space, as well as taking flight. All the while, players will blast away at their opponent and / or slice them up with a melee weapon. It all happens very fast, keeping fights very exciting.

At the moment, many of the arenas are very sparse. In versus matches, they tend to be large, open rings. While these give a lot of room to maneuver, having terrain to work with would add a lot to the experience.

So far, the game’s horde mode appears to be the only place players will find this. Here, players find themselves in a seemingly virtual environment with wire frame buildings. These give one places to take cover from incoming fire, as well as opportunities to take advantage of high ground. This adds a lot to combat and it would be nice to see this in other modes as well, or at least make it available as an option.

Thus far, the game’s graphics are looking pretty decent with some nice mechas to choose from. Meanwhile, the soundtrack has a feel to it that is very similar to arcade games of the 1990s. One can quickly tell that the game’s developers have spent a lot of time with classic mecha games and are pouring their enthusiasm for these into the game’s aesthetics (and everything else too, obviously).

There will plenty of game modes for players to sink their teeth into in Garrison: Archangel. The game will include both a single player and online versus mode. Versus combat will actually support up to four players, so things can get pretty hectic. There will be a survival mode where players face off against one robot after the next. Also, there will be the horde mode alluded to earlier, which does exactly what players will expect. Between all of these and heading off to the garage to make custom robots, things are shaping up to give players plenty to do.

As it stands, there is a lot to like in Garrison: Archangel. The game has quite a bit of potential. At this point, it largely needs more meat on its bones. It’s still in early access, though, so there will be plenty of opportunity for that. Versus-styled mecha games sort of fell off the face of the earth. This game could help to bring them back. It’ll be exciting to see where the developers take things from here.

The game is currently available on Steam Early Access.